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Simulation of UN Meetings – MUN

In the last 20 years, especially in international schools in various parts of the world (including Brazil, of course), the simulation of UN meetings called MUN (Model United Nations) have become increasingly common. It can be said that these events work almost as a natural necessity within the schools that prepare their students for a […]


In 14 of August of 2018

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In the last 20 years, especially in international schools in various parts of the world (including Brazil, of course), the simulation of UN meetings called MUN (Model United Nations) have become increasingly common. It can be said that these events work almost as a natural necessity within the schools that prepare their students for a world reality that is close to all of us. Therefore, they show and develop in the students this sense of responsibility, giving instruments so that they can participate actively in the development of the world.

Although it is a simulation, themes, ideas, discussions and the use of a foreign language, English (in the case of Brazilian students, for example), are very real and are part of a real possibility and a real understanding of the paradigms which involve international relations.

In addition to this relationship and the real possibility of professionally developing a career linked to the UN or community support institutions scattered around the world, a student participating in such a simulation becomes a citizen prepared to use his skills and competencies developed over the years. years in school. It is not necessarily the content he needs to account for a debate, but knowledge of how to use that content, how to acquire it, or what to do with it. That is, the students need to understand how to develop the skills (Social, Communicative, High-management, Thought and Research) and, therefore, use them in the way that is necessary.

Thinking in this way, and being in tune with the reality of the international education community, the Swiss-Brazilian College, besides participating in events of this nature in different parts of Brazil, organizes its own simulation, the SMUN.

Going for the third edition, SMUN is the UN simulation, organized 100% by the students who are part of the MUN club (called deMUNz) and by the high school coordination. Each student has his or her function within this universe, such as the logistics to receive the guests, the plans to get sponsors, invitations for the schools, organization of the topics within the committees, the opening and closing ceremony and so on.

In a simulation event at the UN meetings held in São Paulo at the beginning of last year, we participated with 10 students from our school. There were about 250 participants in total, from international schools in the region in other parts of Brazil and Latin America. In the opening address, a special guest gave us signs that we were on the right path. This American, who among other professions works on special missions for the UN, said that the previous week, he had participated in a meeting at the UN headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland, with several representatives of the institution, including the secretary general, Portuguese António Guterres.

Earlier this year, we participated in another event in São Paulo, this time organized by Harvard, with the participation of several American students, as well as Brazilians and other Latinos. The opening was given by a Brazilian who has been working on special missions to the UN for 20 years around the world. He described his experiences in the countries where he spent all these years, the languages ​​he learned, the people he met and helped, the structure that involved his activities and more. A speech that impressed everyone and made many dream.

What do these two situations have in common? In addition to much determination, study, willingness to do something so that our community develops in the best possible way and focus on the goal there was one thing that stood out above the rest. In both cases, the two professionals started their careers even when they were high school students in their respective colleges! In other words, their colleges promoted events, in which the students and guests represented a country (thus representing a political position and an ideal), a political maneuver and a cultural thought, within a debate that was done around a common theme. Exactly what we were doing in these two events!

In this way, we create what our education prioritizes: autonomy so that students can work in an organized way, developing their skills and competencies and, at the same time, knowing that they are part of a community in which each one has its importance, thus strengthening the head, the heart and the hands.